First Time Volunteering Abroad

The first time I traveled by myself was my Freshman year of college when I ventured off to volunteer in Nicaragua. A few months before I left on a flight by myself to meet a group of strangers, I was sitting in my Chemistry class in Felmey Hall when a recruit came in to spread the word about an organization I had never heard of, GIVE Volunteers. With little research I convinced myself that this was a step I should take and signed myself up. Fast forward to awkwardly sitting on an old school bus full of 30 other volunteers, traveling down a gravel road to a small fishing village on Western coast of the country. Though the first 12 hours were a little awkward and intimidating I grew to love that group of strangers and some of them are still my good friends now, four years later. We started in the small town of Jiquilillo building houses for single and abused mothers and worked our way to Little Corn Island, teaching kids and working with a recycling program.

Poverty in some of these places were high, I saw things that I had only seen on the news before and never thought I would experience first hand. But I also gained a new respect for the world, for my family and friends and all that we have. Little did I know at the time that this trip would change who I was, how I viewed the world, and what I would want to do for the rest of my life.

It was when my flight landed in Chicago that for the first time in my life I had a passion for something. I had done things before that I liked, such as cooking and taking art classes, things that I thought would be fun to do but I had never craved something like this passion before. I had spent the past two weeks traveling around and volunteering in Nicaragua. And those two weeks were the most meaningful weeks of my 18 years of life. At moments it was terrifying, I questioned why I went, I got sick and missed home and my mom, but the more I did and the more I feared, the more I grew and the more I realized that the best things in life are held at the other side of fear. I had to stretch past my anxiety to hop on that plane and it ended up leading me on an adventure that I can never forget. That adventure sculpted me as an individual. It lead me to the love of my internship, and the work I do around the community.

When I was first offered my internship at Marcfirst my friends told me I was stupid for not looking for an opportunity that would offer pay. I knew it would be relatively time consuming and though doing the work for free wasn’t my first choice, it was an organization that consisted of something that I fully supported. It was that passion to relinquish into the community of doing good and helping others no matter what form it came in. I am currently seven months into my internship and I love every second of it. I would go in more if I had the time, the money means nothing to me and I fully support the work being done. It has proven that money is not the ultimate prize in life, and that happiness in what you are doing with your life is.

If you are not interested in how to deal with stress , then you have already missed a lot.

Snow Removal Contract

This is a legal agreement between a corporation or two individuals specifying the terms for snow removal from a property. You may sign a contract with a company or an individual to have snow removed from your home or a business such as clearing your driveway, shovel the sidewalk, or clear a parking lot. When a corporation sets up a contract it could state in there that the sidewalks and parking lots be clear of ice and snow by a certain time of the day. It can also just be a written agreement without involving an attorney or having it notarized by a notary public.

When filling out a snow removal contract there should be certain information included in the contract, which includes, but not limited to:

• Address of the property for snow removal
• Name(s) of the person who owns the property
• The name, address, and phone number of the company that is removing the snow.
• Length of the contract
• How much for snow removal
• What the company is suppose to do such as the driveway, sidewalks, etc
• When it is suppose to be done
• How much it will cost
• How payments are to be made
• What will happen if the bill is not paid

One of the most important aspects of such a contract is the fee schedule. There is usually no set fee but a price is set for each type of snow removal. It also should include how the services will be billed and when. Some companies want to be paid the day of the service while others will bill you each month for services rendered. Choose a company that best suits the way bills are paid. This is important to know, especially areas where there is sporadic snowfall.

Another important factor in such a contract is the time when the snow removal will take place. Many time individuals may not care when their driveways or sidewalks are done but others may. This is especially true for businesses, factories, restaurants, etc. They may be stricter about snow removal. For example, a restaurant may want it all done by the time they are open and if it is a particular heavy snowfall, they may want it done a couple of times during the day. It is important that the parking lots and sidewalks be clean and free from snow and ice to prevent someone from falling. If someone falls then they could sue the business so that is why it important to know when it will be done and how often.